Indonesia

Jakarta, the capital of Indonesia

BaliThe island of Gods

  • Nature
    • Kintamani test

      Kintamani

      Kintamani sits on the rim of the huge Batur caldera about 1,500m above sea level, and offer dramatic views of the active volcano Mount Batur and serene Lake Batur. Temperature is 15 degrees Celsius cooler than on the coast, so warm clothing are recommended.

      As well as the lake and the volcano, Kintamani is home to Pura Ulun Danu Batur, one of Bali's key nine directional temples.

    • Lovina test

      Lovina

      Uluwatu

      The whole stretch of coast here is fringed by quite narrow black sand beaches, which are accessed by a multitude of small lanes which run perpendicular to the east-west coast road. The beaches are generally safe for swimming and the waters of Bali's north coast are relatively calm.

      A favorite activity is dolphin watching. Regularly scheduled boat trips can be easily found. Lovina is an area in which to relax and take in a very slow, traditional pace of life.

    • West Bali National Park test

      West Bali National park

      Uluwatu

      Taman Nasional Bali Barat—as it is called in Indonesian—is the most north-westerly point of Bali. This Indonesian National Park includes the whole of the Prapat Agung Peninsula, and large swathes of land around the towns of Gilimanuk, Cekik and Banyuwedang. The official area inside the park boundaries is 190 square kilometers, with a further 580 square kilometers of protected reserve in the highlands to the east. In total this accounts for some ten percent of Bali's total land area.

    • Sanur test

      Sanur

      Sanur

      Known as the oldest upscale resort area in Bali, Sanur is a mature beach-side town with a quiet and relaxed atmosphere. Approximately three kilometers south of Sanur, one could find the Serangan Island Turtle Conservation Centre (Turtle Island). Open daily, the Turtle Conservation and Education Centre showcases current conservation initiatives.

    • Menjangan Island test

      Menjangan Island

      Uluwatu

      Named by locals after the wild deer herds, menjangan, swimming to the island every spring, Menjangan Island sports what is probably the best snorkeling site in Bali due to good clear water and calm seas.

      Part of the West Bali National Park, the Menjangan Island's marine fauna incorporates one of the best-preserved coral reefs in the area. All scuba-diving shops arrange daily trips to the island.

  • Economy
    • Celuk village test

      Celuk Village

      Uluwatu

      Celuk is one of the many villages in Bali that specializes in specific crafts. Known for the artistic works of its local silversmiths, Celuk is a must-stop destination for those who wish to learn more about the craft and admire silver jewelry that range from the traditional to the modern and avant-garde.

    • Kuta test

      Kuta

      Kuta

      No trip to Bali is complete without having experienced sunset at Kuta. The five kilometers long sandy stretch of Kuta is arguably the best beach front in Bali. Clean and well maintained, Kuta Beach is known as a surfing paradise and has now evolved into a tourist hotspot with plenty of shops and restaurants lining up the streets behind the beach. Kuta is a lively place throbbing with the hustle and bustle of nightlife once the sun has set.

    • Sukowati test

      Sukowati

      Sukawati

      Looking for affordable souvenirs to bring back home? Head on over to Sukowati, an arts market popular with the locals as well as international tourists. Numerous number of small stalls line the two stories building—almost all kinds of Bali souvenirs can be found in here: painting, woodcarving, masks, clothes, temple umbrellas and other temple accessories, shadow puppets, wind chimes, jewelries and many more. Sukowati is worth a visit just to experience the lively atmosphere.

  • Culture / Society
    • Tanah Lot test

      Tanah Lot

      Uluwatu

      Tanah Lot—"Land in the Sea" in Balinese—is a temple sitting on top of a large offshore rock shaped continuously over the years by the ocean tide. The Tanah Lot temple's striking silhouette against a sunset backdrop has become a cultural icon for photography and is instantly recognizable.

      Believed to be the work of revered 15th century Hindu priest Nirartha, the temple plays an important element in Balinese spiritualism and mythology. The Balinese believe that a sacred sea snake of black and white color transformed from Nirartha's scarf guards the temple.

      The Tanah Lot Temple is one of several sea temples around the Balinese coast established within eyesight of the next one to form a chain along the south-western coast.

    • Besakih test

      Besakih

      Uluwatu

      The Mother Temple of Besakih, or Pura Besakih, is located in the village of Besakih on the slopes of Mount Agung in eastern Bali. It is the most important, largest and holiest temple of Hindu religion in Bali.

      This Mother Temple is a complex made up of twenty-two temples that sit on parallel ridges. It has stepped terraces and flights of stairs which ascend to a number of courtyards and brick gateways that in turn lead up to the main spire or Meru structure, which is called Pura Penataran Agung. All this is aligned along a single axis and designed to lead the spiritual person upward and closer to the mountain which is considered sacred.

      There are at least seventy festivals held at the complex each year, since almost every shrine celebrates a yearly anniversary. This cycle is based on the 210-day Balinese calendar year.

    • Uluwatu test

      Uluwatu

      Uluwatu

      The region of Uluwatu is a very well known destination among surfing enthusiasts. Most of the surf spots are only suitable for advanced or expert surfers though, as the waves are big here.

      The surfing hotspot belies the fact that Uluwatu is also the site of the Uluwatu Temple, perched on a steep cliff 70 meters above the roaring Indian ocean waves and regarded to be among the most important temples in Bali. Built in the 11th, it is one of the 'directional temples' protecting Bali from evil spirits.

      The famous kecak dance, or monkey dance, is held daily at the temple. It is a spectacular feast for the eyes as numerous dancers form a circle and begin to chant.

    • Ubud test

      Ubud

      Uluwatu

      In contrast to the main tourist area in southern Bali, the Ubud area has forests, rivers, cooler temperatures and less congestion. It is located amongst rice paddies and steep ravines in the central foothills of the Gianyar regency. Ubud's sprawling forests and paddy fields have made it a perfect retreat destination.

      In the late 19th century, Ubud became the seat of feudal lords who were significant supporters of the village's increasingly renowned art scene. Ubud is now known as the cultural center of Bali, with paintings influenced by some of the world's greatest artists.

  • Airport
    • Ngurah Rai test

      Airport

  • Kintamani

    Kintamani sits on the rim of the huge Batur caldera about 1,500m above sea level, and offer dramatic views of the active volcano Mount Batur and serene Lake Batur. Temperature is 15 degrees Celsius cooler than on the coast, so warm clothing are recommended.

    As well as the lake and the volcano, Kintamani is home to Pura Ulun Danu Batur, one of Bali's key nine directional temples.

  • Lovina

      The whole stretch of coast here is fringed by quite narrow black sand beaches, which are accessed by a multitude of small lanes which run perpendicular to the east-west coast road. The beaches are generally safe for swimming and the waters of Bali's north coast are relatively calm.

      A favorite activity is dolphin watching. Regularly scheduled boat trips can be easily found. Lovina is an area in which to relax and take in a very slow, traditional pace of life.

  • West Bali National Park 3

      Taman Nasional Bali Barat—as it is called in Indonesian—is the most north-westerly point of Bali. This Indonesian National Park includes the whole of the Prapat Agung Peninsula, and large swathes of land around the towns of Gilimanuk, Cekik and Banyuwedang. The official area inside the park boundaries is 190 square kilometers, with a further 580 square kilometers of protected reserve in the highlands to the east. In total this accounts for some ten percent of Bali's total land area.

  • Sanur

    Known as the oldest upscale resort area in Bali, Sanur is a mature beach-side town with a quiet and relaxed atmosphere. Approximately three kilometers south of Sanur, one could find the Serangan Island Turtle Conservation Centre (Turtle Island). Open daily, the Turtle Conservation and Education Centre showcases current conservation initiatives.

  • Menjangan Island

    Named by locals after the wild deer herds, menjangan, swimming to the island every spring, Menjangan Island sports what is probably the best snorkeling site in Bali due to good clear water and calm seas.

    Part of the West Bali National Park, the Menjangan Island's marine fauna incorporates one of the best-preserved coral reefs in the area. All scuba-diving shops arrange daily trips to the island.

  • Celuk Village

    Celuk is one of the many villages in Bali that specializes in specific crafts. Known for the artistic works of its local silversmiths, Celuk is a must-stop destination for those who wish to learn more about the craft and admire silver jewelry that range from the traditional to the modern and avant-garde.

  • Kuta

    No trip to Bali is complete without having experienced sunset at Kuta. The five kilometers long sandy stretch of Kuta is arguably the best beach front in Bali. Clean and well maintained, Kuta Beach is known as a surfing paradise and has now evolved into a tourist hotspot with plenty of shops and restaurants lining up the streets behind the beach. Kuta is a lively place throbbing with the hustle and bustle of nightlife once the sun has set.

  • Sukowati

    Looking for affordable souvenirs to bring back home? Head on over to Sukowati, an arts market popular with the locals as well as international tourists. Numerous number of small stalls line the two stories building—almost all kinds of Bali souvenirs can be found in here: painting, woodcarving, masks, clothes, temple umbrellas and other temple accessories, shadow puppets, wind chimes, jewelries and many more. Sukowati is worth a visit just to experience the lively atmosphere.

  • Tanah Lot

    Tanah Lot—"Land in the Sea" in Balinese—is a temple sitting on top of a large offshore rock shaped continuously over the years by the ocean tide. The Tanah Lot temple's striking silhouette against a sunset backdrop has become a cultural icon for photography and is instantly recognizable.

    Believed to be the work of revered 15th century Hindu priest Nirartha, the temple plays an important element in Balinese spiritualism and mythology. The Balinese believe that a sacred sea snake of black and white color transformed from Nirartha's scarf guards the temple.

    The Tanah Lot Temple is one of several sea temples around the Balinese coast established within eyesight of the next one to form a chain along the south-western coast.

  • Besakih

    The Mother Temple of Besakih, or Pura Besakih, is located in the village of Besakih on the slopes of Mount Agung in eastern Bali. It is the most important, largest and holiest temple of Hindu religion in Bali.

    This Mother Temple is a complex made up of twenty-two temples that sit on parallel ridges. It has stepped terraces and flights of stairs which ascend to a number of courtyards and brick gateways that in turn lead up to the main spire or Meru structure, which is called Pura Penataran Agung. All this is aligned along a single axis and designed to lead the spiritual person upward and closer to the mountain which is considered sacred.

    There are at least seventy festivals held at the complex each year, since almost every shrine celebrates a yearly anniversary. This cycle is based on the 210-day Balinese calendar year.

  • Uluwatu

    The region of Uluwatu is a very well known destination among surfing enthusiasts. Most of the surf spots are only suitable for advanced or expert surfers though, as the waves are big here.

    The surfing hotspot belies the fact that Uluwatu is also the site of the Uluwatu Temple, perched on a steep cliff 70 meters above the roaring Indian ocean waves and regarded to be among the most important temples in Bali. Built in the 11th, it is one of the 'directional temples' protecting Bali from evil spirits.

    The famous kecak dance, or monkey dance, is held daily at the temple. It is a spectacular feast for the eyes as numerous dancers form a circle and begin to chant.

  • Ubud

    In contrast to the main tourist area in southern Bali, the Ubud area has forests, rivers, cooler temperatures and less congestion. It is located amongst rice paddies and steep ravines in the central foothills of the Gianyar regency. Ubud's sprawling forests and paddy fields have made it a perfect retreat destination.

    In the late 19th century, Ubud became the seat of feudal lords who were significant supporters of the village's increasingly renowned art scene. Ubud is now known as the cultural center of Bali, with paintings influenced by some of the world's greatest artists.

  • Ngurah Rai